Learn how to save money and reduce the environmental impact of our resources.


On this page

1. Save energy and water
2. Protect your home against flooding
3. Current offers and credits

Save energy and water

Save energy and money on your utility bill by:
  • shifting your use of electric appliances such as dishwashers, dryers and stoves to off-peak price periods
  • switching your light bulbs to light-emitting diode (LED) bulbs/lights
  • using a clothesline or clothes rack to dry your clothes instead of your dryer
  • getting your furnace checked annually
  • installing weather stripping around all windows and doors
  • increasing insulation in your home, such as in your attic
  • lowering your thermostat during the day or overnight
  • lowering your thermostat on very cold days, to conserve energy on peak heating days
  • unplugging non-essential electronics when you are away on vacation
  • using area rugs to warm up cold floors
  • using blinds and curtains to let the sun heat your home on cold days
  • using blinds and curtains to shade windows on hot days
  • putting your pool pump on a timer
  • using solar lighting outdoors
  • using a toaster oven, microwave or barbecue instead of your stove
  • cleaning or replacing your furnace filter monthly
  • regularly defrosting your refrigerator
  • purchasing Energy Star qualified appliances, which are more efficient than conventional models
  • considering a home energy evaluation by REEP to help make your home more energy efficient
Visit these resources for more conservation tips:

Ministry of Energy, Northern Development and Mines

Energy Star


Save water and money on your utility bill by:
  • taking shorter showers and investing in a low flow shower head
  • plugging the drain before you start to fill the tub so you don’t waste water
  • investing in an ultra-low flush (ULF) toilet
  • using the load selector on your washing machine or only washing full loads
  • keeping a jug of drinking water in the fridge instead of running the tap until the water gets cold
  • getting a free in-home water review through the Region of Waterloo’s WET Program
  • ensuring your water softener is functioning properly by visiting the Water Softener Facts website to learn how to maintain your water softener and prevent water waste

Visit the Region of Waterloo’s water conservation page for more tips and information.


Check your toilets for leaks

You can test your toilet for leaks in two ways:

1. Quick check

  • look at the water level in the water tank
  • the water level should be ½ inch (1.25 cm) below the top of the intake to the toilet
  • if the water level is higher, your float is set too high and needs to be adjusted
  • mark the water level in the water tank with a pencil
  • turn off the intake water supply valve located behind the toilet bowl
  • wait at least one hour, do not flush the toilet during this time
  • if the water level has dropped, you have a slow leak and need to check the condition of your flapper valve

2. Slow leak

  • mark the water level in the water tank with a pencil
  • turn off the intake water supply valve located behind the toilet bowl
  • wait at least one hour, do not flush the toilet during this time
  • if the water level has dropped, you have a slow leak and need to check the condition of your flapper valve

Water leaks in your home

If you have a water leak, you are wasting water. Learn more information on how to prevent, detect and fix water leaks in your home.

Outdoor watering

Outdoor watering is one of the biggest causes of water depletion. Follow these tips when using water outside:

  • water in the early morning or late in the evening and follow the Region of Waterloo’s Water Conservation Bylaw during the summer
  • use mulch to help the soil keep moisture
  • cover swimming pools when not in use
  • use a broom instead of a hose to clean sidewalks and driveways
  • use a low-rise sprinkler head and avoid watering sidewalks and driveways
  • use a rain barrel or cistern

Protect your home against flooding

There are many ways to protect against flooding, both inside and outside of your home.

Stormwater management practices, such as low impact development features installed at the lot-level, can capture and manage stormwater where it falls. In addition to offering a stormwater credit to property owners who take action to reduce stormwater runoff, the City of Kitchener is developing a Market Incentive Program (MIP) to support the installation of low impact development features on private properties.

To learn how to reduce your risk of experiencing a basement flood, visit the Intact Centre on Climate Adaptation for more information on home flood protection.


Current offers and credits

You can save more money by viewing our current offers, credits and rebates to see if you qualify for one of our programs.

Commercial, industrial, institutional customer rebate programs

If you are one of these customers, and you are planning to upgrade equipment in your facility by:

  • saving natural gas
  • reducing your carbon footprint

Contact us by email to learn more information about our current rebate programs.

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